Comments for Investigating Choice Time: Inquiry, Exploration, and Play http://investigatingchoicetime.com by: Renée Dinnerstein Fri, 26 Sep 2014 02:10:24 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Our Country, Our Future by Joan Kramer http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/09/our-country-our-future/#comment-119993 Fri, 26 Sep 2014 02:10:24 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1345#comment-119993 Thanks Renee for posting this. Wish I could be there in person!

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Comment on A SURPRISING FIRST GRADE PET PROJECT by Renee http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/09/a-surprising-first-grade-pet-project/#comment-119992 Fri, 26 Sep 2014 01:52:21 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1277#comment-119992 Thank you Katie. I thought that the teachers were truly excited with the study and with the involvement of the children. It was just as it should be!

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Comment on A SURPRISING FIRST GRADE PET PROJECT by Katie Mullaney http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/09/a-surprising-first-grade-pet-project/#comment-119988 Thu, 25 Sep 2014 22:39:39 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1277#comment-119988 I had the pleasure of seeing this study in action at P.S. 42. Truly amazing.

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Comment on Hurt No Living Thing by Renee http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2013/07/hurt-no-living-thing/#comment-119941 Mon, 22 Sep 2014 12:19:46 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=730#comment-119941 Hello Joan. You have mentioned this Master Teacher, who had such a wonderful effect on you, before and I would love to “meet” her through the internet. Any chance of that?
Thank you for your thoughtful response.
Renee

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Comment on RETHINKING THE EARLY CHILDHOOD COMMON CORE LEARNING STANDARDS by Susanne http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/06/rethinking-the-early-childhood-common-core-learning-standards/#comment-119934 Mon, 22 Sep 2014 03:15:43 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1204#comment-119934 in my chats with you on this topic and reading this engaging and beautifully written post and thoughtful comments, this has become my soundbite in discussions with my fellow k-2nd grade parents. thank you. the response is always, “that is so true, and right my child did not learn to walk until 2 but what does that matter now she is doing back flips.” and many well respected educational philososphies like Waldorf don’t introduce reading until age 7. I am choosing, despite the challenges, to change careers now to education after having two children and a thriving business career. my challenge as a graduate school student and then new teacher will be to have the grit and resilience to continually defend the play, inquiry and child led interest work with my professors and future principles. we learn through living and as a small example when my own children have used an incorrect pronunciation/use of a word or a phrase I won’t correct them with “no this is how you say this” I just simply engage in further conversation about it to continue the dialogue and then restate their statement correctly so they will hear it in the course of our conversation. I’ll bring it up again later so they continue to hear it and eventually, by owning the change themselves, the correct phrase or word happens. That is how we learn to speak through interaction and not instruction. every faculty is the same ……corrections get in the way of letting ideas, creativity and communication flow from all of us.

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Comment on Hurt No Living Thing by Joan Kramer http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2013/07/hurt-no-living-thing/#comment-119933 Mon, 22 Sep 2014 03:15:35 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=730#comment-119933 Thank you Renee for sharing this. I had the tremendous luck to be trained by a teacher who worked hard at building community in her 1-2-3 grades classroom. Because the children were in the class for three years, she was sure to get every child to read by the time they left. But socially, they also were able to train each other in the routines and challenges of the classroom that was full of wonderful centers and activities. This was 1971-72 — and very new to me since I had not been taught that way with so much hands-on and experiential learning. But the most fabulous thing she did was to have a class meeting every day after lunch where the children talked about their problems. In a way, she did what you did by showing empathy and asking for the children to show it. She didn’t put the words in their mouths, she just got them to say what they thought – why is Johnny mad? why does he hit? and sometimes she might answer the question. But she was so skillful at this that the children seemed to get along very well on the whole. I wished so much I could have read more about this — but I did think this was a technique that only she practiced, and there wasn’t much written if anything. By the way, she was always given the most difficult students. I know we discussed behavior modification and were “opposed” to it. But she told me that occasionally it would work – just that she didn’t see that it would work in the long run. This was applied to reading more than to behavior. Anyway – I wish I were more eloquent about this — just to let you know that my Master teacher and I are still friends after all these years.

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Comment on WHAT’S IN A NAME? by Susanne http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/08/whats-in-a-name/#comment-119932 Mon, 22 Sep 2014 01:54:50 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1254#comment-119932 this is wonderful. thank you for such detail and references.

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Comment on A SURPRISING FIRST GRADE PET PROJECT by Joan Kramer http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/09/a-surprising-first-grade-pet-project/#comment-119849 Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:17:10 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1277#comment-119849 I had the pleasure of doing something similar with a class of 1 -3rd graders in my teaching training. Students each received an earthworm, built a house for it (tin foil I think) and observed them daily. It was wonderful. I do think this one is better because it is collaborative, and children choose what they want to observe. So much more can come out of multiple heads coming together to plan and execute a teaching idea. Thank you for sharing!

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Comment on What Not to Say to a Teacher – revisited and updated! by Patrick http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2014/08/what-not-to-say-to-a-teacher-revisited-and-updated/#comment-119516 Mon, 01 Sep 2014 11:20:55 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=1240#comment-119516 Thanks Renee for posting this great video. Very funny and a little sad.

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Comment on A Wonderful Hum of Activity: Choice Time! by Michelle http://investigatingchoicetime.com/2011/11/252/#comment-119444 Thu, 28 Aug 2014 11:26:36 +0000 http://investigatingchoicetime.com/?p=252#comment-119444 What an amazing description of a Kindergarten classroom. I am a Kindergarten teacher–been so for almost 20 years–and love it. You are correct when you say that there are ridiculous demands being placed on K’s nowadays. Still, I am going to try to incorporate bits and pieces of this approach into my classroom. The pendulum is going to have to swing back at some point and I think that approaches such as Reggio are going to be very popular. So glad I found this article!

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